Doctor of Chiropractic Degree

Doctor of Chiropractic Degree

Logan University provides students superior training, giving them confidence to be the health care leaders of tomorrow.

The Logan education is based on an academic curriculum that is grounded in the Logan tradition and infused with current research, technology and proven practices to educate tomorrow's chiropractor.

By offering students hands-on experience early in their education, a broad diversity of clinical immersion opportunities and business classes instructed by one of the nation's top MBA programs, our graduates are confident and better prepared to lead the integrated health care industry.



Free Ride to Logan University!

Beginning with the incoming class of Fall 2018, the Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) student with the highest GPA at the end of their third trimester will receive a scholarship covering the rest of their DC education! Scholarship requirements must be maintained for continued receipt of the scholarship throughout the remainder of the DC program.

Doctor of Chiropractic Scholarship

  • Doctor of Chiropractic Admissions Requirements

    Admissions Requirements

    Admissions guidelines for the Doctor of Chiropractic Degree.

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  • Doctor of Chiropractic Clinical Opportunities

    Clinical Opportunities

    A wealth of clinical experiences are available to each Doctor of Chiropractic student.

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  • Doctor of Chiropractic Techniques

    Chiropractic Techniques

    Learn about the core chiropractic techniques taught as well as the variety of electives available.

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  • Doctor of Chiropractic Curriculum

    Curriculum

    Details regarding the Doctor of Chiropractic curriculum.

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Speak to Dr. Ridgeway today!

Learn more about Logan's curriculum, campus atmosphere and life after graduation.

Contact Admissions@logan.edu or request information to schedule a call with Dr. Ridgeway.

Dr. Daryl Ridgeway

  • Course Descriptions

    TECH2A401         Activator I          
    2 credit hours   

    Activator Methods is a system of body mechanics and technique emphasizing methodology which teaches where, when, and when not to adjust in reestablishing and maintaining a more normal dynamic developmental and physiological relationship of the human body.

    Pre-requisites: Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physio II   
                   
    TECH2A502         Activator II         
    0.5 credit hours

    A continuation of the Activator Method of patient health care emphasizing review of previous study and more advanced application.

    Pre-requisites: Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physio II, Activator I
                                   
    BMEC30801        Advanced Biomechanics
    3 credit hours   

    The concepts of joint mechanics and joint stability, both spine and extremities, are applied to patient assessment and management.  Ergonomics, gait analysis, pathokinesiology of joints, and functional anatomy are reviewed in the context of patient assessment and management.

    Pre-requisites: Physical Rehab 2                              

    ANAT10101         Anatomy I          
    3 credit hours    

    This course will present the anatomy of the back, upper and lower limbs, and the thoracic and abdominal walls through cadaveric dissection. Laboratory activities will be supplemented by lectures, clinical correlation, presentations audio-visual aides, and online activities.  Basic anatomic terminology, osteology, arthology, angiology and neurology will be emphasized, along with basic biomechanical and kinesiologic principles.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy I Lab   

    ANATL10101       Anatomy I Lab  
    2 credit hours     

    This course will present the anatomy of the back, upper and lower limbs, and the thoracic and abdominal walls through cadaveric dissection. Laboratory activities will be supplemented by lectures, clinical correlation, presentations audio-visual aides, and online activities.  Basic anatomic terminology, osteology, arthrology, angiology and neurology will be emphasized, along with basic biomechanical and kinesiologic principles.

    Pre-requisites: Anatomy I           

    ANAT10202         Anatomy II         
    3 credit hours

    This course is a detailed study of the human regional gross anatomy related to the head and neck. Students will learn the anatomical structure via classroom presentation and discussion. The clinical relevance of each region will be included and developmental anatomy will be covered periodically throughout the course.  This course is a detailed study of human head and neck gross anatomy. Students will learn the structures and relationships of the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, and visceral components of the head and neck via lectures, in-class discussions, and supplementary videos. Histology, development, and clinical relevance are reinforced.

    Pre-requisites: Anatomy I, Anatomy I Lab
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy II Lab   

    ANATL202           Anatomy II Lab 
    1.5 credit hours

    This course is a detailed study of human gross anatomy related to the head and neck regions. In a laboratory format, students will explore the anatomical structures via hands-on dissection and peer demonstrations.  This course is a detailed study of human head and neck gross anatomy. In a laboratory setting, students will learn the structures and relationships of the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, and visceral components of the head and neck via hands-on dissections and peer demonstrations. Histology, development, and clinical relevance are reinforced.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy I, Anatomy I Lab            
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy II

    ANAT10303         Anatomy III       
    3 credit hours   

    This course will present the anatomy of the thoracic and abdominopelvic cavities, and viscera.  Lectures will be supplemented with clinical correlation presentations, audio-visual aides, and online activities. Cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital and reproductive systems will be emphasized, along with additional anatomic terminology, osteology, arthrology, angiology and neurology. 

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab, Physiology I              
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy III Lab  

    ANAT1L303         Anatomy III Lab
    1.5 credit hours

    This course will present the anatomy of the thoracic and abdominopelvic cavities, and viscera.  Lectures will be supplemented with clinical correlation presentations, audio-visual aides, and online activities. Cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital and reproductive systems will be emphasized, along with additional anatomic terminology, osteology, arthrology, angiology and neurology. 

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab, Physiology I
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy III          

    BUSI20603           Billing and Documentation
    3 credit hours  

    This course will cover the guidelines and regulations that govern the documentation, coding and healthcare compliance laws for healthcare providers and includes specific information associated with the chiropractic profession. The course is designed to provide the student the ability to learn from lecture and class interaction as well as through investigative/integrative work via the internet and professional documents provided. Upon completion of the course, students will have a comprehensive list of resource materials needed to function as a healthcare provider who is compliant with the federal regulations as they pertain to chiropractic.

    BCHM10201       Biochemistry I  
    3 credit hours  

    The chemistry and function of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins are discussed.  Enzyme function is explained both quantitatively and qualitatively, and the details of the electron transport system are covered with an emphasis on intracellular energy conversions.  Laboratory experiments focus on enzyme kinetics and chemical reactions of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.

    Pre-requisites:Undergraduate Chemistry Recommended                           

    BCHM10302       Biochemistry II 
    4 credit hours   

    Catabolic and anabolic pathways for carbohydrates, fatty acids, and amino acids are explained with an introduction to the function of B-complex vitamins in these processes. The role of selected hormones in the metabolism of various biomolecules is described, and the well-fed state is contrasted with starvation condition in human organisms.  Portions of the course are devoted lipid transport and pathways of specialized metabolites

    Pre-requisites:Biochemistry I                   

    PYSO10101         Cell Biology       
    2 credit hours                                   

    Cell Biology introduces the student to the basic structure, function and interrelations in a eukaryotic cell.  A special emphasis is placed on molecular and genetic functions.

    CLIN30802          Clinic 2 
    5 credit hours                   

    This is the second course in the clinical practicum series continuing the learner’s journey to demonstrating the ability to be entrusted to practice as an autonomous chiropractic physician. Students render chiropractic services under the mentorship of their assigned clinician. The primary objective of this practicum will to develop and assess the progression of clinical skills to demonstrate that the learner is fit to advance to the next level of clinical practicum.  The practicum will consist of patient care rotations through the Logan University Health Centers as well as regular one on one sessions between students and their attending clinicians dedicated to assessment feedback, student’s self-reflection and development of improvement plans.

    Pre-requisites:Clinic 1, Billing & Doc, Rad-Positioning, OBGYN, Diagnostic Imagining V, Pediatrics, Geriatrics, Clinical Nutrition III, Clinical Psy
    Co-requisites:
    Dermatology, Emergent-Urgent, Endocrine, Practice Procedures

    CLIN30903           Clinic 3 
    8 credit hours   

    This is the third course in the clinical practicum series continuing the learner’s journey to demonstrating the ability to be entrusted to practice as an autonomous chiropractic physician. Students render chiropractic services under the mentorship of their assigned clinician. The primary objective of this practicum will to develop and assess the progression of clinical skills to demonstrate that the learner is fit to advance to the next level of clinical practicum.  The practicum will consist of patient care rotations through the Logan University Health Centers, the Integrated Health Centers and the Human Performance Center, as well as regular one on one sessions with their clinicians dedicated to assessment feedback, student’s self-reflection and development of improvement plans.

    The rotations are an integral part of the students’ clinical education where they learn to function in different clinical environments and see a wide variety of patient presentations.

    Pre-requisites:Clinic 2, Dermatology, Emergent-Urgent, Endocrine, Practice Procedures
    Co-requisites:
    Clinic Grand Rounds         

    CLIN310C4           Clinic 4 
    8 credit hours   

    This is the final course in the clinical practicum series continuing the learner’s journey to demonstrating the ability to be entrusted to practice as an autonomous chiropractic physician. Students render chiropractic services under the mentorship of their assigned clinician or through preceptor opportunities. The primary objective of this practicum is to refine and assess the progression of clinical skills to demonstrate that the learner is fit to advance to independent practice.  The practicum will consist of patient care rotations through the Logan University Health Centers, the Integrated Health Centers and the Human Performance Center, or through preceptor opportunities for those students who qualify

    Pre-requisites:Clinic 3                  

    CLIN31004           Clinic Capstone
    3 credit hours   
                   

    This course is designed to supplement Trimester 10 students’ clinical experience and development in terms of designing a case presentation and poster based on a patient the student has managed in one of Logan’s clinics or during his/her preceptorship. In this course students will design an educational poster including HPI, ROS, Physical Examination, Medical History, Family History, Social History, Occupational History, Pertinent labs/imaging, Differential Diagnosis, Diagnosis, Treatment and Management and Conclusion/Take home points.  Students will also be expected present their poster orally, in a 3-5-minute case presentation.

    Pre-requisites:Clinic 3  
    Co-requisites:
    Clinic 4 or Preceptor

    CLIN309R3           Clinic Grand Rounds
    1 credit hour     

    Case Management with correlation and review of adjusting and supportive procedures

    Pre-requisites:Clinic 2  
    Co-requisites:
    Clinic 3   

    CLIN310R3           Clinic Grand Rounds
    1 credit hour     

    Case Management with correlation and review of adjusting and supportive procedures

    Pre-requisites:Clinic 3
    Co-requisites:
    Clinic 4   

    CLIN30701          Clinic I  
    5 credit hours   

    This is the first course in the clinical practicum series. This course begins the learner’s journey to demonstrating the ability to be entrusted to practice as an autonomous chiropractic physician. The primary objective of this practicum will be an establishment of the learner’s baseline clinical competencies and to assess the progression of the learner’s clinical skills to demonstrate that the learner is fit to advance to the next level of clinical practicum. The practicum will consist of patient care rotations through the Logan University Student Health Center as well as weekly case-based discussions and clinical in-services.

    Pre-requisites:Diagnostic Imaging IV, Jurisprudence, Correlative Technique II, Logan Basic III, Modalities, Physical Rehab, Principles of Chiro, Physical Diagnosis II, Nutrition II, Internal Disorders, Diagnostic Imagining IV, Clinical Methods VI, Diversified IV, Activator II, Lab Diagnosis, EENT, Myofascial II, NMS Disorders, Info Lit 2, Clinical Reasoning III, Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Cell Bio, Histology, Physiology III, BioChem II, Functional Anatomy II, Micro, Pathology II         
    Co-requisites:Billing & Doc, Rad-Positioning, OBGYN, Diagnostic Imagining V, Pediatrics, Geriatrics, Clinical Nutrition III, Clinical Psy

    CMTD10101        Clinical Methods I
    6 credit hours                   

    Clinical Methods 1 is the first in a series of courses that applies anatomical and physiological principles to clinical skills and assessment procedures to inform differential diagnosis and treatment. 

    Co-requisites:Anatomy I, Anatomy I Lab, Clinical Reasoning I    

    CMTD10202        Clinical Methods II
    3 credit hours   

    Clinical Methods 2 will focus on foundational procedures that will emphasize the neurological system. This course will apply the anatomical and physiological principles to the foundational clinical skills and assessment procedures that inform diagnosis and treatment.

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods I, Clinical Reasoning I   
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab, Clinical Reasoning II

    CMTD10303        Clinical Methods III
    1.5 credit hours
                   

    This course is a continuation of the Clinical Methods I and II course and designed to provide the student with a logical and systematic approach to system specific examination procedures, discussing differential diagnosis and a consideration of appropriate necessary diagnostic testing methods to develop a working diagnosis. There is also a focus on recognizing common clinical conditions. The systems addressed in Clinical Methods III include: the respiratory, cardiovascular, peripheral-vascular, gastrointestinal system regional exams. This lab portion of the course emphasizes the hands-on examination components.

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods II, Clinical Reasoning II
    Co-requisites:
    Clinical Reasoning III

    CMTD20404       Clinical Methods IV
    2.5 credit hours

    Clinical Methods IV will focus on students demonstrating competence at the I (Interpreter) level of the RIME evaluation system during small group and clinical instruction with standardized patients in the Assessment Center and didactic instruction in the classroom. Students will continue to perform at the R (Reporter) level in order to interpret what may be going on with the patient (differential diagnosis) demonstrated through simulated clinical encounters and written cases. Students will also be expected to communicate with an instructor using SNAPPs to facilitate clinical reasoning (Summarize history and findings; Narrow the differential; Analyze the differential; Probe for uncertainties; and begin to discuss and Plan management and Select case-related issues for self-study). Students are expected to begin functioning at an Interpreter level (according to the RIME assessment) on low complexity cases and demonstrate a greater knowledge base, increased confidence and skill in selecting and communicating clinical facts to a patient. In addition, students will demonstrate the ability to pose clinical questions as well as organize, prioritize and interpret problems. Students will be expected to perform physical examination skills (orthopedic tests, regional examinations, review of systems) necessary to formulate a diagnosis.  This is the fourth in a series of six Clinical Method courses designed to develop the students’ clinical skills. In this course, students will work toward refining NMS examination skills previously learned. Through the use of patient cases, students will work on improving history gathering skills, determination and performance of appropriate regional examinations. From there interpretation of the history and exam findings will lead toward developing a differential diagnoses of common musculoskeletal conditions. It is expected that students’ draw on the clinical reasoning processes to determine and defend their clinical diagnostic impressions. Treatment options for specific NMS conditions will also be discussed. Lastly, students will be introduced to the process of clinical case presentations through the SNAPPS model. This course will also explore common pitfalls in clinical reasoning within the musculoskeletal system and use of metacognition strategies to avoid these errors.

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods III, Clinical Reasoning III  CMTD10303, CREA10303, ANAT10303, ANAT1L303
    Co-requisites:
    NEUR20403 –NMS Disorders        

    CMTD20505        Clinical Methods V
    2 credit hours   

    Clinical Methods V will focus on students demonstrating competence at the I (Interpreter) level of the RIME evaluation system during small group and clinic instruction with peer and standardized patients in the Assessment Center or lab and didactic instruction in the classroom. Students will continue to perform at the R (Reporter) level in order to interpret what may be going on with the patient (differential diagnosis) demonstrated through simulated clinical encounters and written cases. Students will also be expected to communicate with an instructor using SNAPPs to facilitate clinical reasoning (Summarize history and findings; Narrow the differential; Analyze the differential; Probe for uncertainties; and begin to discuss and Plan management and Select case-related issues for self-study). Students are expected to continue functioning at an Interpreter level (according to the RIME assessment) on low/moderate complexity cases in the chest and first part of the abdomen (to the duodenum) and demonstrate a greater knowledge base, increased confidence and skill in selecting and communicating clinical facts to a patient. In addition, students will demonstrate the ability to pose clinical questions as well as organize, prioritize and interpret problems. Students will be expected to perform physical examination skills (orthopedic tests, regional examinations of the heart and lungs and peripheral vascular system, and review of systems) necessary to formulate a diagnosis.

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods IV, Clinical Reasoning III
    Co-requisites:
    Internal Disorders I, Physical Diagnosis-ID 1          

    CMTD20606        Clinical Methods VI
    2 credit hours   

    Clinical Methods VI will focus on students demonstrating competence at the I (Interpreter) level of the RIME evaluation system during small group and clinic instruction with peer and standardized patients in the Assessment Center or lab and didactic instruction in the classroom. Students will continue to perform at the R (Reporter) level in order to interpret what may be going on with the patient (differential diagnosis) demonstrated through simulated clinical encounters and written cases. Students will also be expected to communicate with an instructor using SNAPPs to facilitate clinical reasoning (Summarize history and findings; Narrow the differential; Analyze the differential; Probe for uncertainties; and begin to discuss and Plan management and Select case-related issues for self-study). Students are expected to continue functioning at an Interpreter level (according to the RIME assessment) on low/moderate complexity cases in the abdomen and demonstrate a greater knowledge base, increased confidence and skill in selecting and communicating clinical facts to a patient. In addition, students will demonstrate the ability to pose clinical questions as well as organize, prioritize and interpret problems. Students will be expected to perform physical examination skills (orthopedic tests, regional examinations of the abdomen and review of systems) necessary to formulate a diagnosis. This is the final course in the series of six Clinical Method courses designed to develop the students’ ability to perform clinical examination skills. In this course students will continue to advance their skills in interpretation of clinical exam procedures to elicit differential diagnoses of both visceral and NMS systems. It is the expectation that students’ will draw on clinical reasoning processes to determine and defend their clinical diagnostic impressions. Students will work to refine and advance their skill of clinical case presentations through the SNAPPS model. Students will also continue to advance their skill in identifying common pitfalls in clinical reasoning within the neurovascular system and use of metacognition strategies to avoid these errors.

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods V, Clinical Reasoning III, Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders, Neuromusculoskeletal Diagnosis, Physical Diagnosis-ID 1 CMTD20505
    Co-requisites:
    Internal Disorders II, Physical Diagnosis-ID 2 IDIS20602, PHDX20603

    NUTR30703         Clinical Nutrition III
    2 credit hours   

    This course presents a detailed study of the principles of nutrition concentrating on the biochemical, physiological, and pathological relationship in the management of acute and chronic conditions affecting humans. Topics taken into consideration include diet and nutritional supplementation. The signs, symptoms, and diagnostic testing will be discussed for each condition, with special emphasis on neuromusculoskeletal and other conditions encountered in clinical practice.

    Pre-requisites:Nutrition 2                          

    PSYH30701         Clinical Psychology
    3 credit hours                                   

    Clinical Psychology is designed to explore the interface between psychiatry, psychology and chiropractic at a professional level. This means that we will study a combination of content areas selected from the discipline of psychology on the basis of their relevance to chiropractic practice. In an applied sense, each topic can stand as an independent unit of study.  In the larger perspective, continuity across topics will be provided by integrating theory and practice as they combine to create a context for generating effective helping strategies and interventions.

    CREA10101          Clinical Reasoning I
    3 credit hours                   

    This is an entry level course designed to provide the student with a logical and systematic approach to critical thinking. The process of clinical reasoning involves multiple steps between hypotheses generation to diagnostic verification. In this course we will begin with steps of clinical reasoning, continue with history gathering, patient interview, differential diagnosis, and development of patient records. The lecture portion will focus on the components and clinical implications of these procedures. The lab portion of the course emphasizes the hands-on experience of these skills. As we progress forward the students learning experience will include: patient general inspection, common or concerning symptoms and the musculoskeletal exam including problem solving through low complexity patient cases.

    Co-requisites:Clinical Methods 1            

    CREA10202          Clinical Reasoning II
    3 credit hours   

    This is a progression of the Clinical Reasoning 1 course. It is designed to provide the student with a logical and systematic approach to critical thinking. The process of clinical reasoning involves multiple steps beginning with history gathering, examination procedures, hypotheses generation and diagnostic verification. This course begins with the Head and Neck Exam with an emphasis on Headaches, we continue with the Ears, Nose/Paranasal sinus, Oral Cavity and Eye regional examinations. The last system covered will be the Nervous System culminating into the combined Neuromusculoskeletal spinal examination. In each system the course focus is on obtaining and building on the primary history components; normal and common abnormal exam findings; differential diagnosis and patient records. The lecture portion will focus on the components and clinical implications of history and exam findings. The lab portion of the course emphasizes the hands-on experience of these skills, with an emphasis on focus history gathering and documentation. As we progress forward, the students' learning experience will include generating a diagnosis through problem solving of low complexity patient cases.

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods I, Clinical Reasoning I
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab, Clinical Reasoning II

    CREA10303          Clinical Reasoning III
    3 credit hours   

    This is a progression of the Clinical Reasoning 1 and 2 courses.  It is designed to provide the student with a logical and systematic approach to critical thinking. The process of clinical reasoning involves multiple steps between history gathering, physical examination, hypotheses generation to eventual diagnostic verification. This course covers the Peripheral Vascular System, Cardiac Exam, Respiratory System Exam and the Abdominal Exam. In each system the course focus is on obtaining and building on the primary history components; normal and common abnormal exam findings; differential diagnosis and patient records. The lecture portion will focus on the components and clinical implications of history and exam findings. The lab portion of the course emphasizes the hands-on experience of these skills, with an emphasis on focused history gathering and documentation. As we progress forward, the students' learning experience will include generating a diagnosis through problem solving of low complexity patient cases. We will work in conjunction with the sequence in Anatomy 3 and Clinical Methods 3

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods II, Clinical Reasoning II
    Co-requisites:
    Clinical Methods III          

    PHWE30801       Community Health and Wellness
    1 credit hour     

    This course informs students of major health concerns in the areas of community, occupational, and environmental health and prepares the student to address health promotion and comprehensive wellness within the chiropractic clinical model.

    Pre-requisites:ILIT 20402 Information Literacy II, MICR 10302 Microbiology II, BUSI 20501 Statistics for Healthcare Professionals
                   
    TECH2C501         Correlative Technique I
    1.5 credit hours

    This course is an in-depth overview of chiropractic adjustive techniques not confined to a single technique system. This course will compare and contrast general chiropractic adjustive principles to the four specific technique systems taught at Logan. The goal of this course is to broaden the students' knowledge of chiropractic adjustive techniques and to utilize this knowledge in refining their core techniques.

    Pre-requisites:Diversified III, Activator I, Logan Basic I                  

    TECH2C602         Correlative Technique II
    1.5 credit hours

    Somato-visceral and viscera-somatic effects in clinical diagnosis and treatment. A holistic approach to patients using chiropractic adjusting, nutrition, lifestyle management and manual soft tissue techniques from chiropractic, applied kinesiology, Sacro-Occipital Technique™ and osteopathy.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    DERM30801        Dermatology
    2 credit hours   

    The course emphasizes clinical diagnosis and management of common and serious dermatologic diseases. The curriculum includes lectures, clinical case presentations, reading assignments, and goal-oriented study guides for each major topic.

    Pre-requisites:Internal Disorders 2                        

    DIMG20402        Diagnostic Imaging II
    2 credit hours   

    This course emphasizes the role of diagnostic imaging in the detection and characterization of pathological process of the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems. Normal radiographic anatomy, imaging tools, mensuration, normal skeletal variants, and disorders of the chest will be addressed.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physio II
    Co-requisites:
    Foundations of DI

    DIMG20503        Diagnostic Imaging III
    4 credit hours     

    This course emphasizes the role of diagnostic imaging in the detection and characterization of pathological process of the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems. Normal radiographic anatomy, imaging tools, mensuration, normal skeletal variants, and disorders of the chest will be addressed.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Diagnostic Imaging II, Pathology II, Cell Biology, Physiology III
    Co-requisites:
    Internal Disorders I, Physical Diagnosis - ID 1, Laboratory Diagnosis I

    DIMG20604        Diagnostic Imaging IV
    3 credit hours   

    This course integrates conventional radiography with advanced diagnostic imaging techniques in the evaluation of ambulatory care disorders. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate indications for the use of advanced imaging. Small group teaching is included. This course emphasizes additional topics in diagnostic imaging including arthritis, infectious, nutritional, metabolic, endocrine, neoplastic, and tumor-like diseases of bone.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Diagnostic Imaging III, Functional Anatomy, Pathology II, Physiology III                               

    DIMG30705        Diagnostic Imaging V
    3 credit hours   

    This course presents the role of diagnostic imaging in the investigation of common and life-threatening pain syndromes encountered in primary care. Dysplasia's, skeletal trauma, along with disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system will be presented.  Small group teaching is included

    Pre-requisites:Dx Imagining IV                

    TECH1D201         Diversified I
    2.5 credit hours

    This course focuses on chiropractic terminology and conceptual models of pelvic and spinal biomechanics and distortion to include analysis and labeling of pelvic and vertebral subluxation complexes.  Additionally, manual contacts, vertebral contacts, stances and thrusts, table/patient positioning will be emphasized during the laboratory portion of the course.  Pelvic adjusting will be introduced on live subjects after the student has shown proficiency on their practical exam utilizing a speeder board and practice ball.  Additionally, manual contacts, vertebral contacts, stances and thrusts, table/patient positioning will be emphasized during the laboratory portion of the course.  Pelvic adjusting will be introduced on live subjects after the student has shown proficiency on their practical exam utilizing a speeder board and practice ball The Lecture section focuses on the understanding of palpation of osseous and soft tissue anatomy, manual contacts, stances, thrusts, table/patient positioning, and pelvic adjusting techniques as utilized in Diversified technique. Special emphasis will be on Reinert Specific Diversified technique, as well as variations and comparisons with similar associated techniques. Also included in the Lecture will be case studies, which will aid the student in understanding the actual day-to-day issues which arise in private practice.  In the Lab section, the student will analyze their lab partners, learning to identify pelvic malposition's, develop psychomotor skills, and apply those skills, to perform a corrective adjustment as needed, only under supervision.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy I, Anatomy I Lab
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab

    TECH1D302         Diversified II
    2.5 credit hours
                   

    This is the second course in the Reinert Specific Technique series. This course contains an introduction to the specific adjustment of the Lumbar and Thoracic spine, and the understanding of the biomechanical failure of these joints as it relates to subluxations

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab, Diversified I              
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab

    TECH2D403         Diversified III
    2 credit hours   

    This is a hands-on chiropractic adjusting course focusing on conditions related to the upper thoracic and cervical spines.

    Pre-requisites:Diversified II                      

    TECH2D504         Diversified IV
    2.5 credit hours

    This fourth course in the series of Diversified Technique courses specifically addresses the extra-spinal articulations. Also included in the course are reviews of the diversified adjustments taught in the previous diversified series.

    Pre-requisites:Diversified III                     

    TECH3R701         Elective Active Release Technique (ART)
    2 credit hours   

    An intensive hands-on application of the principles and techniques of Active Release Technique ® as it relates to the spine.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    TECH3D801         Elective Advanced Diversified
    2 credit hours   

    An integrative practice management course. Current literature is reviewed and evidence based integrated treatment plans are discussed with emphasis in manipulation. Orthopedists, physiatrists, ATC’S, and PCP-sports medicine specialists are brought in to discuss integrated treatment approaches to common MSK conditions and injuries

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I, Diversified IV                   

    TECH3B801.2      Elective Advanced Logan Basic
    2 credit hours   

    This course is designed to further refine the students’ understanding and skills in the application of Logan Basic Technique and Logan Basic
    Methods as an adjusting technique with special attention given to the diagnosis and management of scoliosis. This course includes diagnostic procedures unique to the detection of scoliosis and procedures to monitor progress of conservative corrective care. 
    This course includes an overview of other adjusting techniques, corrective exercises, bracing and other adjunct procedures that can have an impact on the condition known as scoliosis.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I, Logan Basic III  

    TECH3K701.1      Elective Applied Kinesiology (AK)
    2 credit hours   

    Applied Kinesiology - manual muscle testing and application of applied kinesiology methods to analysis and treatment of muscular imbalance, pelvic and spinal problems.  Introduction to cranial techniques and meridian therapy. Part of the International College of Applied Kinesiology basic certification course."

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I or permission of the instructor                  

    TECH3x701          Elective Cox
    2 credit hours   

    An introductory course in Flexion Distraction (Cox) Adjusting technique. Particular attention will be applied to the diagnosis and treatment of low back pain (LBP).

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    TECH2I601           Elective Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue (IASTM)
    0.5 credit hours

    A study of manual, nonarticular manipulation and adjusting which will follow traditional chiropractic rationale to improve clinically identifiable aberrant neurological reflex or pain patterns in the soft tissue

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    TECH3Z702          Elective McKenzie Part A
    1 credit hour     

    McKenzie Method® of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy® (MDT) is a unique, dynamic and comprehensive system of assessment, classification, treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders. Its framework allows one to screen, categorize and apply tailored treatment and a preventative program for each patient. The Part A course focuses on the application of the MDT for the Lumbar Spine. The goals of this course are to gain knowledge and skills that form the basis from which one begins to develop their abilities in applying these principles.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    TECH 2Z601         Elective McKenzie Part B
    1 credit hour     

    McKenzie Method® of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy® (MDT) is a unique, dynamic and comprehensive system of assessment, classification, treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders. Its framework allows one to screen, categorize and apply tailored treatment and a preventative program for each patient. The Part A course focuses on the application of the MDT for the Lumbar Spine. The goals of this course are to gain knowledge and skills that form the basis from which one begins to develop their abilities in applying these principles.

    Pre-requisites:McKenzie Part A               

    TECH3Y081         Elective Minor Surgery
    1.5 credit hours

    This is an elective course that teaches the concepts and applications of minor surgery that is within the scope of chiropractic practice in some states.  This course meets the requirements for licensure in Oregon

    Pre-requisites:Clinic 1
    Co-requisites:
    Clinic 2

    HC10907.01       Elective Preceptorship
    0 credit hours   

    All course and clinic graduation requirements have been met with the exception of the required clinical hours for completion of the program. The student is in good academic and behavioral standing with the institution.              Clinic 4              student doctors complete Health Center requirements and participate in a variety of activities designed to enhance exposure to different clinical settings. Outside preceptorships provide an opportunity to spend time in the practice of an off-campus or out-of-state Doctor of Chiropractic. Field rotations in local practicing chiropractor's offices provide the opportunity for student doctors to continue to treat their patients in the clinics while spending time observing care delivery in a private practice. Limited opportunities exist for month long rotations through Des Peres Hospital.  Rotation assignments through the clinic at the Veterans Administration Medical Center are available for student doctors that are selected to participate in that program. These opportunities, combined with in-house preceptorships, help conclude a well-rounded clinical experience.

    TECH3P804         Elective Pregnancy and Pediatric Management
    2 credit hours   

    This course emphasizes the chiropractic management of conditions relevant to pregnancy and pediatrics. The approach includes chiropractic management with emphasis on various chiropractic techniques, soft tissue management and nutritional approaches to common musculoskeletal, and viscerosomatic conditions in pregnancy and pediatrics.  Chiropractic methods include an integration of chiropractic adjustments/manipulation of spine, basic cranial maneuvers, soft tissue/fascial approaches and viscerosomatic methods.  Alternative and complementary approaches will be discussed.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    TECH2E601          Elective SFMA
    1.5 credit hours

    The Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) is a comprehensive assessment used to classify movement patterns and direct manual therapy and therapeutic exercise interventions. The SFMA, in part, is based on the concept of regional interdependence in that we must assess and treat dysfunction away from the patient's primary location of pain. The SFMA will guide the clinician to the most dysfunctional region that is adversely affecting the movement pattern.  The SFMA uses movement as its form of diagnosis.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    TECH2S601          Elective SOT Basic
    2 credit hours   

    This course is designed to show competency in the philosophy, diagnosis, body mechanics, adjusting techniques and management protocols utilized in Sacro Occipital Technic (SOT® Methods) , which includes categorization, adjusting protocols, pelvic blocking and basic cranial maneuvers.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    TECH3S702          Elective SOT Intermediate
    2 credit hours   

    This course is a continuation of the previous specialized technique Sacro Occipital Technic (SOT® Methods), which includes theory, protocols and application with an emphasis on patient management and adjusting methods: spinal, extraspinal and cranial.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I and SOT Basic                    

    TECH3T701          Elective Thompson
    2 credit hours   

    This course is designed to teach the theory, diagnosis, body mechanics, adjusting skills, and patient management using the Drop Table Assisted/Thompson Technique and Derifield Leg Check Analysis.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    TECH2U601         Elective Upper Cervical
    2 credit hours   

    The course is designed to teach the theory and application of principles used in the practice of Upper Cervical Specific technique.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    Elective Introduction to Gonstead
    2 credit hours   

    This course is designed to demonstrate correlation in the use of Gonstead Technique interpretation with x-ray and spinal analysis.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    Elective Gonstead Cervical/Thoracis
    1.5 credit hours

    A continuation of the previous specialized technique in Gonstead theory and application with a more advanced adjusting technique.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I                 

    Elective Gonstead Lumbar/Pelvis
    1.5 credit hours

    This course is designed to show competency in theory, diagnosis, body mechanics, adjusting skills and correlation of the Gonstead Technique into chiropractic management of indicated health problems.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I, Cervical/Thoracic                           

    Elective Comprehensive Gonstead
    1.5 credit hours

    A continuation of the previous specialized technique in Gonstead theory and application with a more advanced adjusting technique.

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I, Introduction to Gonstead                           

    TECH 3K903        Elective Advanced AK
    2 credit hours   

    Measurement and correction of global biomechanics, hidden muscle dysfunction. Detailed muscle testing. Advanced cranial and meridian therapy. Advanced applied kinesiology procedures. Final part of the International College of Applied Kinesiology basic certification course including certification examination.

    Pre-requisites:Intermediate AK or Permission of the Instructor and Co-requisite
    Co-requisites:
    Intermediate AK

    TECH3K802         Elective Intermediate AK
    2 credit hours   

    A continuation of Applied Kinesiology methodology emphasizing review of previous study and more advanced application. Part of the International College of Applied Kinesiology basic certification course. Includes additional muscle conditions beyond weak/strong, extremity conditions, nutritional analysis, intermediate level cranial, TMJ and acupuncture treatments.

    Pre-requisites:Applied AK or Permission of Instructor                   

    Elective Upper Cervical Technique
    2 credit hours   

    The biomechanics of the upper cervical spine is presented, as well as a reinforcement of static and motion palpation skills critical in an upper cervical practice.  Upper cervical   x-ray line analysis and adjusting procedures are presented.  The use of chiropractic thermography and leg checks are presented as they pertain to an upper cervical practice

    Pre-requisites:Correlative Technique I or Permission of Instructor                          

    EMUR30801        Emergent Urgent Care
    1 credit hour     

    In this course, students will gain knowledge, skills and experiences with a variety of information regarding conditions which can be deemed either urgent or emergent when seeking care. The content of this course will guide the student in preparing to encounter conditions of this nature. This is an online one credits fifteen-week course

    Pre-requisites:Internal Disorders 2                        

    ENDO30801        Endocrine
    1 credit hour     

    This course presents the diagnostic criteria for the study of normal and pathological conditions affecting the endocrine system.

    Pre-requisites:Biochemistry II, Pathology II, and Physiology III                 

    EENT20501          Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat Diagnosis
    2 credit hours   

    This course emphasizes clinical diagnosis and management of common and serious conditions of the eyes, ears, nose, and throat in the portal-of entry health care setting. The curriculum includes lectures, clinical case presentations, reading assignments, and goal-oriented study guides for each major topic.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab, Histology, Clinical Reasoning III, Microbiology II, Pathology II, Physiology III                           

    DIMG20401        Foundations of Diagnostic Imaging
    2 credit hours   

    This course introduces the spectrum of diagnostic imaging technologies. Clinical indications and contraindications, physics of various imaging technologies, radiobiology, and quality assurance are addressed. The fundamentals of advanced imaging technologies are also included.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab

    FANT10101         Functional Anatomy
    3 credit hours                   

    This course is a detailed study of the anatomy and function of the neuromusculoskeletal system of the human body. The approach will be regional in nature, with units pertaining to the back and spine, central and peripheral nervous systems, gluteal regions, superficial chest and abdominal wall, and the upper and lower extremities. Clinical context and clinical application of the anatomical knowledge will be emphasized, along with biomechanical and kinesiological principles. A discussion on clinically relevant embryological and developmental anatomy will take place.

    Co-requisites:Anatomy I             

    FNDC10101         Fundamentals of Chiropractic
    1 credit hour                                     

    The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the historical background and development of the Chiropractic Profession and Logan College, and to provide an overview of contemporary and the future role that the chiropractic physician will fill. 

    NUTR20401         Fundamentals of Nutrition I
    3 credit hours   

    This course examines the fundamentals of nutrient chemistry and metabolism.  Emphasis will be placed on the structure, function, and health concerns of the energy yielding nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and water.

    Pre-requisites:Biochemistry II                  

    GERI30701           Geriatrics
    1 credit hour     

    This is an interactive course which will offer the student an in-depth understanding of the process of aging. Problem oriented presentation of the subject includes general and chiropractic specific topics as well as case studies in geriatrics.

    Pre-requisites:Internal Disorders 2                        

    BUSI30702           Healthcare Accounting
    3 credit hours                                   

    The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the basic concepts of accounting. Accounting is the language of business. Accounting provides the basic foundation for constructing and understanding financial statements. Managers and business owners use financial statements to provide them vital information to run their business operations. The topics included in this course for Health Care Accounting have extensive applications in both financial and managerial accounting.

    BUSI30804           Healthcare Economics
    3 credit hours                                   

    The course module will focus on developing the tools of economic reasoning needed to make sound managerial decisions. Towards that goal, economic analysis as they pertain to markets, firms, and competition among firms will be developed. The course will focus on developing the foundations of economic analysis and their application to gain insight into strategic decisions made by managers of firms to secure and maintain competitive advantage. Synergies between statistical analysis and economic analysis will be explored and applied.

    BUSI30805           Healthcare Logistics
    3 credit hours                                   

    A capstone business course designed for students in Doctor of Chiropractic degree program in which concepts related to business, marketing and ethics will be presented and discussed. This course will assist students in identifying the health care supply, logistics, organizational framework, and ethical business planning that are pertinent in the health care industry.  Students will be able to identify potential markets, streamline practice growth, and have a basic understanding of the business culture related to health care.  Students will be able to apply these basic principles to chiropractic practice.  We will also use strategy and business planning concepts that will allow the future practitioner to become entrepreneurs and implement these strategies throughout the business environment.  As the health care market evolves it is necessary for the health care professional to understand the principles and applications of business with an ever-changing environment.  This will be a graduate level business planning and marketing class with a health care logistics concentration. The course is 45hours (3 credits) held for 3 hours per week in an online format.

    ANAT10102         Histology
    2 credit hours                                   

    This histology course presents the normal microscopic architecture of human tissues and organs with an emphasis on correlating structure with function.

    ILIT10101             Information Literacy I
    1 credit hour                                     

    This is the first in a series of courses series on Evidence-Informed Practice (EIP). This course introduces information literacy emphasizing search strategies for health care databases and search engines. Students will develop the search skills necessary to efficiently access the professional health care literature and related information resources relevant to chiropractic education and clinical practice. The course material will be delivered in a blended learning format and incorporate interactive lectures, in class-activities, Self-Service leaning modules, and search-related homework assignments.

    ILIT20402             Information Literacy II
    2 credit hours   

    This is the second in a series of courses on Information Literacy, a critical skill in performing in an evidenced based practice setting. This course will introduce the student to the core skills necessary to search, acquire and appraise evidence in support of the clinical practices of chiropractic. This course is delivered in a 15-week format with 2 lecture hours per week which will include class lectures and reading assignments.

    Pre-requisites:Info Lit I                

    IDIS20501            Internal Disorders I
    4 credit hours   

    This course presents the diagnostic criteria for the study of normal and pathological conditions affecting the cardiorespiratory system.

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods III, Clinical Reasoning III, Pathology II, Physiology III      
    Co-requisites:
    Clinical Methods V, Physical Diagnosis-ID 1

    IDIS20602            Internal Disorders II
    4 credit hours   

    Internal Disorders II is an evidenced based course; and 1 of this trimester’s 4 co-requisite courses focusing on interpreter level knowledge of internal conditions/diseases. This course will apply the anatomical, physiological and pathological knowledge gained from previous courses to better understand the pathophysiology and clinical presentation associated with disorders of the gastrointestinal, renal-urinary tract, and reproductive systems. Exam findings, diagnostic studies and standard treatment approaches will be discussed to re-enforce the information presented in Physical Diagnosis 2 and Clinical Methods 6; and provide a better understanding of conservative care options presented in Correlative Technique 2.  Internal Disorders II is an evidenced based course; and one of this trimesters’ four co-requisite courses focusing on interpreter level knowledge of internal conditions/diseases. This course applies knowledge gained from previous anatomy, physiology, and pathology courses to better understand the pathophysiology and clinical presentation associated with disorders of the gastrointestinal, renal-urinary tract, and reproductive systems. Exam findings, diagnostic studies and standards of care will be discussed. This should help to coordinate and re-enforce the information presented in Physical Diagnosis 2, Clinical Methods 6, and Diagnostic Imaging IV.

    Pre-requisites:Clinical Methods III, Clinical Reasoning III, Pathology II, Physiology III, Physical Diagnosis-ID 1 Completion of all of the Anatomy, Physiology, Pathology, Clinical Reasoning Courses. Clinical Methods 1-5, Physical Diagnosis 1 and Internal Disorders 1.     
    Co-requisites:
    Clinical Methods VI, Physical Diagnosis-ID 2, PHDX20603, CMTD20606, DIMG20604

    JURI20601           Jurisprudence
    1 credit hour                                     

    This course covers the legal aspects to case history records and clinical procedures. The chiropractic physician’s legal and ethical duties to the patient are examined and discussed. The statutory definition of chiropractic in various states is examined, particularly as these statutes place duties and limitations on the practicing chiropractic physician. The goal is to protect students from future lawsuits

    LADX20501          Laboratory Diagnosis
    2 credit hours
       

    This course presents concepts relevant to the utilization of clinical laboratory assessment as part of the clinical decision-making process for the primary health care provider. Selected areas of laboratory evaluation including venipuncture and standard clinical microscopy of blood and urine samples will be incorporated into the course.  Introduction to the utilization of clinical laboratory assessment as part of the clinical decision-making process for the primary health care provider.

    Pre-requisites:Biochemistry II, Cell Biology, Physiology III, Pathology II
    Co-requisites:
    Internal Disorders I, Physical Diagnosis-ID 1

    TECH2B401         Logan Basic I
    2 credit hours   

    This is the first course of Logan Basic Technique with special emphasis on understanding spinal and pelvic biomechanics. Spinal Distortional Analysis will be discussed in detail. This introductory course has emphasis on definitions, x-ray interpretations, and explanation of spinal and body mechanics, as related to the development of spinal distortions.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab                       

    TECH2B502         Logan Basic II
    2 credit hours   

    This is the second course in the series of a one-year study of Logan Basic Technique. This is a lecture & laboratory course designed to develop the understanding of the biomechanics of Logan Basic Methods and the skills of Logan Basic Technique. This course includes hands-on training of adjusting using Logan Basic Technique and the Full Spine X-ray measuring (marking) and analysis. These skills will be combined and used in a laboratory setting to enhance the learning experience.

    Pre-requisites:Logan Basic I, Anatomy III, Anatomy Lab III                          

    TECH2B603         Logan Basic III
    1.5 credit hours

    This is the third in the series of the Logan Basic Technique courses. This course continues from the last two with a review of the previous two courses. New Logan Basic Technique adjusting procedures will be introduced and workshopped. Consideration of a variety of everyday patients and of special needs of pregnancy, infant care, spinal emergency and conditions of geriatric patients will be discussed from a LBT perspective. This includes a complete work-up including any necessary imaging, from selecting the form of the imaging to its analysis. Incorporation of case management from initial assessment to case outcomes are discussed in detail. The course concludes with an introduction to Advanced Logan Basic Methods and the conservative management of scoliosis.

    Pre-requisites:Logan Basic II                     

    MICR10201         Microbiology I
    3 credit hours                                   

    An introduction into human immunology and infection control. Consideration of vaccines, hypersensitivities, autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies. Histology and production and function of white blood cells is studied. Public health and epidemiology is studied.

    MICR10302         Microbiology II
    4 credit hours   

    This course focuses on major clinical aspects of microbiology based on the fundamentals as taught in Microbiology I. Infectious diseases, along with treatments and prevention methods, are highlighted. The role of Chiropractic in boosting the immunity status of individuals is a major component of this course. Laboratory exercises in this course stress the diagnosis of disease and the identification of the causative agents.

    Pre-requisites:Microbiology I                   

    PRHE20603         Modalities
    1.5 credit hours

    This course provides students with the necessary strategies to assess and provide rehabilitation strategies for spinal issues to help patients achieve functional restoration of the spine and extremities through multiple modalities rehabilitation strategies.  This course presents an introduction to and history of therapeutic physical modalities including indications, contraindications, applications, actions, physical, and physiological effects.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physiology III                         

    TECH1M101        Myofascial Technique
    1 credit hour                     

    Myofascial technique is included as a core technique at Logan in light of the emerging evidence of the effect of soft tissue therapies on overall health and wellness.  Concepts of how various soft tissue therapies affect the myofascial system are covered in detail in the core curriculum.  Specific soft tissue techniques are offered through numerous elective courses

    Co-requisites:Anatomy I             

    TECH2M402        Myofascial Technique II
    1.5 credit hours

    This is the second of a series of courses on Myofascial Techniques, one of the core techniques within the Logan DCP. This course will further the work and topics covered in Myofascial Technique I, focusing specifically on the various treatment aspects utilized in the treatment of myofascial disorders including trigger points, dysfunctional movement patterns and soft tissue rehabilitative techniques. The course will be presented in a 1-hour lecture format and 1-hour practical lab per week. All lecture material will be available for viewing and preparing prior to that week's class meeting time. Students are expected to view the lecture material prior to attending class.

    Pre-requisites:Myofascial I, Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physio II                        

    NEUR10202         Neuroanatomy I
    3.5 credit hours

    This course provides an in-depth presentation of the morphological organization of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Lecture sessions include descriptions of neurological disorders and lesions and their significance. Laboratory sessions correlate with course content and include demonstrations and hands-on experience with human neurological specimens.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy I, Anatomy I Lab                            

    NEUR10302         Neuroanatomy II
    3 credit hours   

    This course provides an in-depth presentation of the morphological organization of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Lecture sessions include descriptions of neurological disorders and lesions and their significance. Laboratory sessions correlate with course content and include demonstrations and hands-on experience with human neurological specimens.

    Pre-requisites:Neuroanatomy I, Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physio II               

    NEUR20403         Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders
    3 credit hours   

    This course introduces the student to neurological and orthopedic testing. It includes evaluation of the patient through performance of cranial nerve, reflex, sensory, and motor examination. Standard orthopedic testing of the spine and extremities is demonstrated. Common pathologies of each area are discussed.

    Pre-requisites:Functional Anatomy, Neuroanatomy I, Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physio II
    Co-requisites:
    Neuroanatomy II

    NUTR20602         Nutrition II
    3 credit hours   

    This course presents a detailed study of human biochemistry of micronutrients, their relationship with macronutrients, and how nutrition influences metabolism, cells, and body function. Vitamins and minerals will be discussed in relation to metabolism and digestion. The clinical signs and symptoms of nutritionally-related disorders and biochemical and laboratory assessment will be introduced.

    Pre-requisites:Nutrition I                           

    OBGY30701        Obstetrics/Gynecology: Topics in Women's Health
    2 credit hours   

    This course emphasizes the practical management of conditions relevant to women. The multi-disciplinary approach taken includes gender differences in health care, health maintenance and disease prevention, risk factors, and the manifestations, natural course, and treatment of disease. The discussions of each system will emphasize characteristics of each life phase – adolescence, reproductive age, menopause, and the postmenopausal years. Chiropractic care and complementary approaches to women's health issues will be emphasized.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy II, Biochemistry II, Histology, Cell Biology, Neuroanatomy, Physiology II, Microbiology II, Pathology II, Embryology, Spinal Anatomy                          

    BUSI30806           Office Management
    3 credit hours                                   

    The emphasis on the doctor/patient relationship where the student develops a professional approach to patient management, education, referral practices and the management of health insurance cases

    PATH10301         Pathology I
    4 credit hours   

    This lecture-based course introduces basic concepts and principles of pathology, especially etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of the human body's general response to disease. Additional topics covered include specific organ system pathology of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. The role of both appropriate and faulty immune system dynamics in various disease states is stressed.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab, Physio I                       

    PATH20402         Pathology II
    3 credit hours   

    This lecture-based course continues building on concepts learned in Pathology I, with an overview of disease in organ-based systems. There is particular emphasis on anatomic pathology, clinical manifestations, disease screening, and current allopathic treatment options in order for students to recognize disease patterns encountered in their patients. The immunologic underpinnings of many diseases as well as the body's response is a recurrent theme in this course.

    Pre-requisites:Pathology I, Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physio II                          

    PEDS30701          Pediatrics
    1 credit hour     

    This course emphasizes clinical diagnosis and management of common pediatric conditions. The course also presents normal and abnormal childhood development and maintenance of a healthy child.  It includes lectures, clinical case presentations, reading assignments and goal-oriented study guides for each major topic.

    Pre-requisites:Internal Disorders 2                        

    PHAR30701         Pharmacology/Toxicology
    2 credit hours   

    This course presents basic concepts of pharmacology and toxicology. The curriculum includes lectures, reading assignments, and a written assignment.

    Pre-requisites:Histology, Anatomy III, Biochemistry II, Microbiology II, Pathology II, Cell Biology, Physiology III                

    PHDX20502         Physical Diagnosis - ID I
    2 credit hours   

    This course explores the clinical method of physical diagnosis of the most common and serious internal disorders of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and peripheral vascular systems, as well as differential diagnostic considerations including the upper GI tract. The course is designed to provide the student with a logical and systematic approach to system-specific history gathering, examination procedures, differential diagnosis, and appropriate diagnostic testing methods with the goal to attain a working diagnosis.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab   Histology, Clinical Methods III, Clinical Reasoning III, Microbiology II, Pathology II, Physiology III, Cell Biology                          

    PHDX20603         Physical Diagnosis - ID II
    2 credit hours   

    This course is designed to provide a systematic approach to physical diagnosis. Current diagnostic methods will be presented related to the gastrointestinal, genitourinary, male reproductive, female reproductive and breast systems. Each system will be approached to provide specific history gathering, examination procedures, differential diagnosis and diagnostic testing procedures with the intent of arriving at a working diagnosis. This course is a lecture format designed to provide a systematic approach to regional physical examination procedures, significance of exam findings and common correlated conditions. The expectations are that students will continue to advance their clinical examination and interpretation skills. Systems covered will include the respiratory, cardiac, PVS, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, male and female reproductive systems. Students will demonstrate the ability to approach these systems with and appropriate understanding and synthesis of clinical information such as patient history, symptoms, risk factors and examination findings. From there students’ will demonstrate their ability to arrive at a differential diagnosis and eventual working diagnosis for common clinical presentations.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Histology, Clinical Methods V, Clinical Reasoning III, Internal Disorders I, Laboratory Diagnosis, Microbiology II, Pathology II, Physiology III, Cell Biology, Physical Diagnosis-ID 1, and TECH 2C501 Correlative Technique I IDIS20501, LADX20501, PHDX20502, CMTD20505
    Co-requisites:
    Clinical Methods VI, Internal Disorders II, Correlative Technique II DIS20602, CMTD20606               

    PREHE20501       Physical Rehabilitation 1
    1.5 credit hour 

    This course presents an introduction to and history of therapeutic physical modalities including indications, contraindications, and applications, physical and physiological effects.  This course provides students with the necessary strategies to assess and provide rehabilitation for spinal issues in order to help patients achieve functional restoration of the spine and extremities through multiple rehabilitation strategies.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physiology III                         

    PRHE20602         Physical Rehabilitation II
    1 credit hour
         

    This course is a continuation of Rehab 1.  It will reinforce the principles as instructed in that class and expand into more advanced exercise techniques.

    Pre-requisites:Physical Rehab 1                              

    PYSO10202         Physiology I
    4 credit hours   

    This course, the first of a sequence of 3 Physiology courses, introduces the core principles of physiology.  The concepts of homeostasis, membrane transport and electrophysiology are introduced.  The course's main focus is Neurophysiology.  It covers electrical potentials, the general organization of the nervous system, the special senses, the general senses, and the corresponding pathways.   The course also discusses spinal reflexes, the ANS (autonomic nervous system), and links brain regions to corresponding functions.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy I, Anatomy I Lab
    Co-requisites:
    Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab

    PYSO10303         Physiology II
    6 credit hours
       

    This course is the second of a 3-semester sequence of courses in Physiology. Physiology II covers the following organ systems: skeletal muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, and the gastrointestinal systems.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy II, Anatomy II Lab, Physiology I                              

    PYSO20404         Physiology III
    4 credit hours
       

    Physiology III is the last of a three-semester study of human physiology.  It covers the endocrine, renal, and reproductive organ systems.  The course ends with a comprehensive review of all organ systems.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physiology II                          

    PPRO30801         Practice Procedures
    2 credit hours
       

    Case Management with correlation and review of adjusting and supportive procedures

    Pre-requisites:Diversified III, Activator II, Logan Basic III                              

    PHIL10101           Principles of Chiropractic I
    3 credit hours
                                       

    Introduction to the art, science and philosophy of chiropractic including discussions and lectures on the history and evolution of the chiropractic profession with emphasis on the chiropractic construct and the related theories and hypotheses supporting the vertebral subluxation complex.

    PHIL20502          Principles of Chiropractic II
    2 credit hours   

    Introduction to the art, science and philosophy of chiropractic including discussions and lectures on the history and evolution of the chiropractic profession with emphasis on the chiropractic construct and the related theories and hypotheses supporting the vertebral subluxation complex.

    Pre-requisites:Principles of Chiropractic I                           

    PHIL20603           Principles of Chiropractic III
    2 credit hours   

    PHIL30703 Principles of Chiropractic III is a continuation of PHIL20502 Principles of Chiropractic II. Principles of Chiropractic III will further explore the subluxation complex and its major hypotheses. During the first four weeks, evidence of the spinal articular lesion itself will be emphasized and then attention will be turned to the broader implications of the subluxation complex during the remainder of the course. 

    Pre-requisites:Principles of Chiropractic II                          

    RADP20601         Radiographic Positioning
    1.5 credit hours

    A comprehensive presentation of radiographic positioning for the appendicular and axial skeleton is presented. A small group session is included and allows hands-on learning.

    Pre-requisites:Anatomy III, Anatomy III Lab, Physiology III                         

    BUSI20601           Statistics for Health Professionals          
    3 credit hours
                                       

    This course challenges students to think about business problems in a systematic fashion by reviewing statistical concepts and developing statistical thinking skills. Statistical thinking can lead to both a better understanding of the problems and can result in higher quality solution options. The course provides coverage of the widely used statistical methods to aid in problem formulation, data analysis and managerial decision-making. At the end of this course, students will have more sophisticated and realistic understandings of the analytics that underlie statistical concepts, issues involving data interpretation, and decision-making under conditions of uncertainty

  • Program Learning Outcomes
    • PLO1 – Patient Care - Demonstrate effective, safe, high quality, evidence informed patient care using clear and sound best practices in patient history, diagnosis, treatment, collaboration, and follow-up for optimum patient outcomes.
    • PLO2 – Scientific Knowledge - Demonstrate critical thinking through the use of current evidence informed practice and the inception of new knowledge.
    • PLO3 – Practice-based and Reflective Learning -  Critically analyze healthcare, business, basic science literature, and other information sources for the purpose of self and practice improvement.
    • PLO4 – Interpersonal and Communication Skills -  Demonstrate strong inter-professional communication skills that support effective information exchange with patients, patient family members, professional associates, and other individuals within the health care system.
    • PLO5 – Professionalism -  Demonstrate responsibility, ethical practices, sensitivity to diverse patient populations, and compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.
    • PLO6 – Integrative Practice -  Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes necessary to work together across professions to produce optimum patient outcomes.
    • PLO7 – Business of Health Care -  Identify and apply entrepreneurial and systems based business principles related to chiropractic practice and articulate personal strengths and weaknesses in both areas.
  • Why Become a Chiropractor?
    Doctor of Chiropractic Degree

    As a career, the field of chiropractic provides a great quality of life. According to the Chiropractic Economics 2016 Salary and Expense survey, Doctors of Chiropractic spend an average of 34 hours per week engaged in patient care and the average total compensation for a DC is just over $147,000. In addition, over 60 percent of all chiropractors are self-employed.

    The future of chiropractic is bright. Employment of chiropractors is projected to grow 17 percent from 2014-2024, faster than average for all occupations. – Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.

    Logan University believes education should be top quality and should be affordable. As such, Logan strives to offer a quality education, defined as meeting or exceeding our strategic goals, at an affordable cost, defined as charging at or below the mean cost for a like degree.

     Learn more about what sets Logan's Doctor of Chiropractic program apart from other chiropractic programs. 

    Chiropractic vs Other Degrees

     

  • Why Logan University?
    Why Logan?

    Logan University is dedicated to maximizing human performance through innovative health education and continuous quality improvement. With an established and world-renowned reputation for academic excellence, Logan University offers first-class programs, facilities and faculty.

    Logan graduates employ a holistic approach to health and wellness to meet patient demands and to lead the integrated health care industry.

     Learn more about what sets Logan's Doctor of Chiropractic program apart from other chiropractic programs. 


    Innovative Curriculum

    Logan’s Doctor of Chiropractic degree curriculum strives to be evidence-informed and outcome-based in order to create practice-ready Doctors of Chiropractic. The Logan education is based on an academic curriculum that is grounded in the Logan tradition and infused with current research, technology and proven practices to educate tomorrow’s chiropractor.

    Students are introduced early on to a variety of topics, allowing integration of the classroom coursework with hands-on clinical practice. Logan students spend 40% of their time in their first year in hands-on clinical skills courses. By offering students hands-on experience early in their education with a broad diversity of clinical immersion opportunities, Logan graduates are confident and better prepared.

    Logan’s Clinical Advantages

    Logan pushes the envelope to secure immersive, collaborative and outcome-driven opportunities by partnering with diverse organizations. The depth and complexity of care that comes with serving the underserved, the uninsured and the disabled population creates confident and proficient leaders. Beyond the walls of the clinics, student interns are preventing athletic injuries and enhancing human performance of college and high school athletes. Logan is constantly forging new relationships that allow student interns to deepen their knowledge of integrated clinical practice.

    Learn more about the Clinical Opportunities offered at Logan.


    The Trimester System

    Logan’s academic year consists of three 15-week trimesters. Trimesters begin each January, May and September. The trimester format allows for more flexibility for students who are deciding when to begin their education.

    Quality Education at an Outstanding Value

    Quality education at a great value makes Logan a natural choice for those seeking careers in the health care field. Logan’s tuition for undergraduate, graduate and doctorate courses are competitively priced. When Logan students graduate, they leave not only with an outstanding education, but also with smaller student loans.

    In addition to maintaining an affordable tuition, Logan's student loan default rate is one of the lowest in the country. When our students graduate they leave not only with an outstanding education, but also with smaller student loans. Our graduates are able to find jobs and pay back their loans, as evidenced by Logan's low default rate (seen below).

    Logan: 1.1%
    Chiropractic average: 4.2%
    Missouri average: 10.9%
    National average: 11.5%


    Life in Chesterfield

    Logan is located in Chesterfield, Missouri, a western suburb of St. Louis. Chesterfield enjoys the best of both worlds - the safety and tranquility of a suburb, but with the excitement and activity of a larger city. Off campus, students enjoy the vibrant arts and music of Chesterfield along with top-rated schools, beautiful parks and a large variety of shopping venues and restaurants. St. Louis area attractions such as the Saint Louis Zoo, Gateway Arch, Forest Park and professional sports teams are all within a 30-minute drive.

  • The Pro Athlete's Perspective on Chiropractic



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Concurrent Master's Degree

Students entering the Doctor of Chiropractic Program may earn concurrent credit for the Master's of Sports Rehabilitation or the Master's of Nutrition & Human Performance while completing doctoral studies.

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