14th Annual Joseph W. Howe Oration in Diagnostic Imaging

Live Webinar July 30th
14th Annual Joseph W. Howe Oration in Diagnostic Imaging

14th Annual Joseph W. Howe Oration in Diagnostic Imaging

Logan University welcomes Matthew F. Gornet, MD as the keynote speaker for the 14th Annual Joseph W. Howe Oration in Diagnostic Imaging. The Howe Oration will be livestreamed from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Friday, July 30, 2021 at www.logan.edu/live-from-logan/. No registration is required.

Joseph W. Howe, DC, DACBR, Fellow ACCR was instrumental in the evolution of chiropractic radiology as a specialty and helped implement and maintain the highest standards in education, clinical practice and research throughout his long and productive career. Chiropractic radiology helped catalyze chiropractic integration into the modern health care system. The Joseph W. Howe Oration in Diagnostic Imaging is designed to honor his extensive contributions to and achievements in chiropractic radiology.

In his presentation titled “Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) can identify painful lumbar discs and may facilitate improved clinical outcomes of lumbar surgeries for discogenic pain,” Dr. Gornet will highlight data and research on the role MRS may play in surgical outcomes for chronic low back pain patients.

Dr. Gornet is a board-certified spine surgeon with the St. Louis Spine & Orthopedic Surgery Center who specializes in the treatment of patients with low back and neck pain. He earned his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and completed a general surgery residency, an orthopedic surgery residency and a spinal surgery fellowship with world-renewed spine surgeon John Kostuik, MD at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Additionally, Dr. Gornet is the author of several published book chapters and research papers. His subspecialty interests involve treating patients with continued pain after failed surgery. He accepts referrals of difficult revision cases form physicians throughout the nation and is a national leader in the development of dynamic stabilization, disc replacement and “non-fusion” technology.