Bachelor's in Life Science

Bachelor of Science Degree in Life Science

Logan offers a 3+1 option for students interested in a career as a Doctor of Chiropractic. The Bachelor of Science in Life Science (BSLS) degree is offered to those students who have already been accepted into the Doctor of Chiropractic program. 

Classes are offered on campus or online to both first-time freshman and transfer students. Within the first three trimesters of the DC program, applicable Bachelor of Science courses are taken to meet the requirements for the fourth year of the undergraduate degree.

First-time freshman students are able to earn a bachelor's degree and Doctor of Chiropractic degree in approximately six years. This program allows students to earn both degrees more quickly, thus saving on the overall tuition investment.


  • Bachelor's in Life Science

    Admissions Requirements

    Admissions guidelines for the Bachelor's in Life Science degree may be found on Page 27 of the Academic Catalog.

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  • Bachelor's in Life Science

    Tuition & Fees

    View tuition and fees for the Bachelor's in Life Science degree.

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View Logan's Course Credit Equivalency.
  • Academic Degree Plan

    Click here to view the Life Science Academic Degree Plan.

    Click here
    to view the General Education Academic Degree Plan.

  • Course Descriptions
    Lower Division Course Descriptions

    Click here to view the General Education course descriptions.

    Upper Division Course Descriptions

    BIOL01112 General Biology II
    3 credit hours
    This course reinforces concepts introduced in General Biology I. Emphasis is placed on evolution, classification of organisms, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels.
    Prerequisites: General Biology I (or equivalent)

    BIOL0L112 General Biology II Lab
    1 credit hour

    The laboratory reinforces and provides supplemental information related to the lecture topics related to the principles and concepts of biology.
    Prerequisites: General Biology I Lab (or equivalent)

    ANAT10101 Anatomy I
    3 credit hours

    This course is a detailed study of the anatomy and function of the musculoskeletal system of the human body.  The approach will be regional in nature, with units pertaining to the back and gluteal regions, superficial chest and abdominal wall, and the upper and lower extremities.  Clinical context and clinical application of the anatomical knowledge will be emphasized, along with basic biomechanical and kinesiological principles.  A discussion of the clinically relevant features of the embryological development of the neuromusculoskeletal system will also be featured. 
    Pre-requisites: n/a

    ANAT1L101 Anatomy I Lab  
    2 credit hours

    This course will present the anatomy of the back, upper and lower limbs, and the thoracic and abdominal walls through cadaveric dissection. Laboratory activities will be supplemented by lectures, clinical correlation presentations, audio-visual aides, and online activities. Basic anatomic terminology, osteology, arthrology, angiology and neurology will be emphasized, along with basic biomechanical and kinesiologic principles.  
    Pre-requisites: n/a

    PYSO10101 Cell Biology
    2 credit hours

    Cell Biology introduces the student to the basic structure, function and interrelations in a eukaryotic cell.  A special emphasis is placed on molecular and genetic functions. 
    Pre-requisites: n/a

    ANAT10102 Histology
    2 credit hours

    This course presents the normal microscopic architecture of human tissues and organs with an emphasis on correlating structure with function. 
    Pre-requisites: n/a

    ANAT10202 Anatomy II
    3 credit hours

    This course is a detailed study of the human regional gross anatomy related to the head and neck. Students will learn the anatomical structure via classroom presentation and discussion.  The clinical relevance of each region will be included and developmental anatomy will be covered periodically throughout the course.
    Pre-requisites: Anatomy I and lab

    ANAT1L202 Anatomy II Lab    
    1.5 credit hours

    This course is a detailed study of human regional gross anatomy related to the head and neck. In a laboratory format, students will explore the anatomical structure via hands-on dissections and peer demonstrations. In addition, each region will be examined for clinical relevance.
    Pre-requisites: Anatomy I and lab

    CHEM01102 General Chemistry II
    3 credit hours

    In this course, which is offered the second half of a term, students will learn and understand the properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, acid/ base chemistry, buffers, and solubility. 
    Prerequisites: General Chemistry I or equivalent

    CHEM0L102 General Chemistry II Lab
    1 credit hour

    This laboratory course accompanies the General Chemistry II lecture course and includes exercises demonstrating lecture topics. 
    Prerequisites: General Chemistry I Lab or equivalent

    CHEM02201 Organic Chemistry I
    3 credit hours

    In this course, which is offered the first half of a term, students will learn and understand molecular structure and bonding, nomenclature of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and alcohols, stereochemistry, reactivity of acids and bases, and nucleophilic substitution and elimination of alkyl halides. 
    Prerequisites: General Chemistry II or equivalent

    CHEM0L201 Organic Chemistry I Lab
    1 credit hour

    This laboratory course accompanies the Organic Chemistry I lecture course and includes exercises demonstrating lecture topics. 
    Prerequisites: General Chemistry II Laboratory or equivalent

    CHEM02202 Organic Chemistry II
    3 credit hours

    In this course, which is offered the second half of a term, students will learn and understand the chemistry and preparation of alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and amines. 
    Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I or equivalent

    CHEM0L202 Organic Chemistry II Lab
    1 credit hour

    This laboratory course accompanies the Organic Chemistry II lecture course and includes exercises demonstrating lecture topics. 
    Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I Laboratory or equivalent

    PHYS01101 Physics I
    3 credit hours

    This course is offered the first half of a term and presents an introduction to physics concepts, kinetics, mechanics, dynamics, circular motion, work, energy, linear momentum, rotational motion, static equilibrium, fluids, vibration, waves, and sound. 
    Prerequisites: College Algebra

    PHYS0L101 Physics I Lab
    1 credit hour

    This laboratory course accompanies the Physics I course and includes exercises demonstrating lecture topics.
    Prerequisites: College Algebra

    PHYS01102 Physics II
    3 credit hours

    This course is offered the second half of a term and addresses temperature and kinetic theory, heat, laws of thermodynamics, electric charge and potential, electric fields, electric currents, magnetism, electromagnetic induction and waves, light, the theory of relativity, and quantum theory. 
    Prerequisites: Physics I or equivalent

    PHYS0L102 Physics II Lab
    1 credit hour

    This laboratory course accompanies the Physics II course and includes exercises demonstrating lecture topics.
    Prerequisites: Physics I Lab or equivalent

    PYSO10202 Physiology I
    4 credit hours

    This course, the first of a sequence of 3 Physiology courses, introduces the core principles of physiology.  The concepts of homeostasis, membrane transport and electrophysiology are introduced.  The course’s main focus is Neurophysiology.  It covers electrical potentials, the general organization of the nervous system, the special senses, the general senses, and the corresponding pathways.   The course also discusses spinal reflexes, the ANS (autonomic nervous system), and links brain regions to corresponding functions. 
    Pre-requisites: Cell Biology

    MICR10201 Microbiology I
    3 credit hours

    An introduction into human immunology and infection control. Consideration of vaccines, hypersensitivities, autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies. Histology and production and function of white blood cells is studied. Public health and epidemiology is studied.
    Pre-requisites: Histology, Cell Biology

    BCHM10201 Biochemistry I  
    3 credit hours

    The chemistry and function of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins are discussed.  Enzyme function is explained both quantitatively and qualitatively, and the details of the electron transport system are covered with an emphasis on intracellular energy conversions.  Laboratory experiments focus on enzyme kinetics and chemical reactions of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.
    Pre-requisites: Cell Biology

    ANAT10303 Anatomy III
    3 credit hours

    This course will present the anatomy of the thoracic and abdominopelvic cavities, and viscera.  Lectures will be supplemented with clinical correlation presentations, audio-visual aides, and online activities. Cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital and reproductive systems will be emphasized, along with additional anatomic terminology, osteology, arthrology, angiology and neurology. 
    Pre-requisites: Anatomy I and II

    ANAT1L303 Anatomy III Lab
    1.5 credit hours 

    This course is a detailed study of human regional gross anatomy related to the thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and perineum. In a laboratory format, students will explore the anatomical structure via hands-on dissections and peer demonstrations. In addition, each region will be examined for clinical relevance.  
    Prerequisites: ANAT 10202 Anatomy II,  ANAT 1L202 Anatomy II Lab 
    Corequisite: ANAT 10303 Anatomy III 


    PSYO10303 Physiology II
    6 credit hours

    This course is the second of a 3-semester sequence of courses in Physiology.  Physiology II covers the following organ systems: skeletal muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, and the gastrointestinal systems. 
    Pre-requisites: Physiology I

    BCHM10302 Biochemistry II
    4 credit hours

    Catabolic and anabolic pathways for carbohydrates, fatty acids, and amino acids are explained with an introduction to the function of B-complex vitamins in these processes.  The role of selected hormones in the metabolism of various biomolecules is described, and the well-fed state is contrasted with starvation condition in human organisms.  Portions of the course are devoted lipid transport and pathways of specialized metabolites.
    Pre-requisites: Biochemistry I

    MICR10302 Microbiology II
    4 credit hours

    An introduction to microbiology and the microbiology laboratory. Continued exploration into infectious organisms that cause human diseases in all human systems. 
    Pre-requisites: Microbiology I

  • Why Logan University?
    Why Logan?

    Logan University is dedicated to maximizing human performance through innovative health education and continuous quality improvement. With an established and world-renowned reputation for academic excellence, Logan University offers first-class programs, facilities and faculty.

    Logan has been a leader in chiropractic education since 1935. Today, Logan University continues its chiropractic tradition while also offering a variety of online health sciences programs.



    The Trimester System

    Logan University’s academic year consists of three 15-week trimesters. Trimesters begin each January, May and September. The trimester format allows for more flexibility for students who are deciding when to begin their education.



    Quality Education at an Outstanding Value

    Quality education at a great value makes Logan a natural choice for those seeking careers in the health care field. Logan’s tuition for undergraduate, graduate and doctorate courses are competitively priced. When Logan students graduate, they leave not only with an outstanding education, but also with smaller student loans.








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