Women’s Health Symposium Speaker: Arlan Fuhr, DC

Aug. 21, 2019 -- Dr. Arlan Fuhr (’61), chairman and co-founder of Activator Methods International, will be making a special presentation at the Women’s Health Symposium on Saturday, Sept 28.  

From 1 to 2 p.m., Dr. Fuhr will be addressing treatment options for the aging spine, specifically addressing a research study that finds the Activator a safe method for adjusting patients with osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is a disease in which the density and quality of bone are reduced. As bones become more porous and fragile, the risk of fracture is greatly increased.

Not only did the study determine that it was safe, but it showed that there was regrowth in the osteoporotic area of the bone being adjusted,” he said. “This is important because of the amount of osteoporosis in women over the age of 65.”

The Activator Method is the world’s most widely used adjusting technique that is employed by more than 70 percent of all chiropractors and taught in nearly every chiropractic college in the world. 

Dr. Fuhr, who established the National Institute of Chiropractic Research, a nonprofit research foundation, holds 13 domestic patents, 47 worldwide trademarks and more than 100 copyrighted works. 


Logan University’s Department of Postgraduate Education is proud to host the first ever ACA Women’s Council Symposium on Women’s Health. To learn more and register, please visit logan.edu/healthsymposium.


 

 


Logan Health Center clinical faculty demonstrate value of diagnostic ultrasound for muscular dystrophy patients

August 16, 2019 -- A recent case study authored by members of the department of radiology and a Health Center clinician was published in Journal of Ultrasound. It reported that an 8-year-old patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) displayed increased sonoelastographic measures (hardening) of lower extremity muscles when compared with an age-matched healthy control. The report also demonstrated the value of using sonoelastography, a noninvasive ultrasound technique, to diagnose and monitor the progress of DMD.

The case study, titled “Sonoelastography of the trunk and lower extremity muscles in a case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy,” was written by Stacey Cornelson, DC, DACBR; Ashley Ruff, DC; Muriel Perillat, DC, MS,; and Norman Kettner, DC, DACBR, FICC, professor and chair of the Department of Radiology.

DMD is a rare genetic disorder that causes muscle weakness and reduced tone of the core and lower extremities through replacement of muscle by fibrofatty tissue. Sonoelastography ultrasound can be used to demonstrate changes in the muscle mechanical properties due to fatty replacement and fibrosis. Thus far, the use of ultrasound technology in diagnosing DMD patients has been limited. Muscle biopsy is the standard for histologic diagnosis of DMD, but ultrasound may be a noninvasive and more cost-effective approach to assess muscle changes and response to treatment. A goal of this case report was to add to the growing argument for this approach.

The case study also demonstrated the value of chiropractic care for treating DMD symptoms. The patient came to Dr. Perillat for palliative care of low back and bilateral leg pain and headaches. Among other symptoms, a physical exam revealed a mild waddling gait, bilateral pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles and abnormal spinal ranges of motion. The patient also required assistance to climb a flight of stairs.

In addition to sonoelastographic ultrasound to assess muscle stiffness and texture, the patient underwent spinal mobilization, kinesiotaping of lower extremity muscles and was also fitted for foot orthotics to ease the abnormal gait. The patient reported pain reduction and some improvement in gait and required less assistance to climb stairs. 

Opportunity for Logan Alumni to Work for Shanghai Chiropractic

August 15, 2019 -- Attending Chiropractor: Logan University – College of Chiropractic

Once in a lifetime opportunity to practice in the modern metropolitan city of Shanghai. Logan University in a strategic partnership with Shanghai Chiropractic clinic seeks to identify highly qualified, hardworking chiropractors to join their team. The practice embraces a whole body structural approach, taking pride and offering the highest level of effective and compassionate care to patients. We are seeking a well-rounded chiropractor with excellent communication skills that has a desire to work in an engaging and diverse community, committed to excellence, education and service, guided by integrity, commitment and passion.  Competitive salary with travel and housing stipends included. To apply, send your cover letter and curriculum vitae to Cheryl.Maestas@logan.edu

Logan to Host First Women’s Health Symposium

August 12, 2019 -- The American Chiropractic Association’s Women’s Council on Women’s Health will be hosting its first Symposium, September 28-29 on Logan’s campus. The event, “Caring for the Female Patient Throughout Her Physiological Journey,” will feature nationally known women’s health experts on topics such as nutrition and heart disease, brain health, posture, pelvic floor dysfunction, breastfeeding dysfunction and more.

Logan faculty member and ACA Women’s Council President Kristina Petrocco-Napuli, DC, MS, FICC, FACC said she’s excited to bring to light topics that are not regularly discussed in the chiropractic profession. She said her goal was to secure high caliber speakers from around the country who are experts in women’s health, and she hopes that those attending will leave with new strategies for the female patient population. While the event is focused on female health, it is open to all.

View the schedule and learn more about the Symposium here, then register online, by phone at 1-800-842-3234 or by email at postgrad@Logan.edu.  

Stanford Instructor Discusses MRI in Chiropractic at Logan

August 9, 2019 -- Kenneth Weber II, DC, PhD, an instructor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University, recently spoke as part of the Logan Department of Radiology’s Chiropractic Grand Rounds.

Dr. Weber, who earned his clinical training as a chiropractor at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida and then completed a PhD in neuroscience at Northwestern University, currently researches different neuroscience, machine-learning and clinical research techniques to better understand, treat, and prevent musculoskeletal and neurological conditions, including spinal pain.

On August 2, he addressed the topic of advancing chiropractic with advanced magnetic resonance imaging to students, faculty and staff, opening with a general description of the structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology along with their advantages and disadvantages. He described how fMRI provides non-invasive mapping of the brain’s neuroanatomy and neurophysiology in the assessment of patients with chronic pain. Maladaptive neural circuity develops as an adaptive response to the persistent nociception. This adaptation to central sensitization utilizes cortical and subcortical neuroplasticity, and these patterns of brain neural activity are mapped with fMRI technology. Dr. Weber discussed his research in brain-based models of clinical pain states, and has incorporated an artificial intelligence method known as machine learning to enhance models of bran responses to pain. 

He also explained his extensive research of spinal manipulation in healthy and clinical pain disorders, including a new development in his research: spinal cord fMRI. This technique, which Dr. Kettner said has been long hampered by technical challenges, is advancing and may provide a biomarker of spinal cord injury and disorders. In addition, simultaneous fMRI of the spinal cord combined with functional imaging of the brain is now on the horizon.

Dr. Kettner said this corticospinal mapping will provide a perspective of large neural network integration, allowing more precise understanding of chronic pain and other associated disorders, such as anxiety and depression, and their treatment outcomes.  


Logan Clinician and Resident Provide Chiropractic Care to USA Boccia Paralympic Athletes

August 7, 2019 -- Logan’s Paralympic Operation Department recently partnered with USA Boccia for its 2019 Nationals competition in San Antonio, Texas. Devon Ackroyd, DC, CSCS, advanced practice clinician at Paraquad, and Cami Stastny, DC, CCSP, second year resident in Logan’s Human Performance Centers, were in attendance providing chiropractic support for the athletes and learning the classification system for the Paralympic  precision ball sport, similar to bocce, for wheelchair athletes.

“I thoroughly enjoyed working with the Boccia athletes again, helping them prepare, recover and improve their performance,” said Dr. Ackroyd. “I particularly enjoyed being immersed in the classification process, and I look forward to continuing to grow and develop Logan’s partnership with USA Boccia.”  

Drs. Ackroyd and Stastny worked with athletes by stretching them out before and after games and talking with them about seat positioning and general body movement.  Athletes were given time to discuss their needs and how they can work with Logan chiropractors at future trainings and competitions to improve their performance.

“I couldn’t believe how much went into the sport, from the detailed classification system and strategy of play,” said Dr. Stastny. “Everyone was so great to work with, from administrative to athlete. I’m so glad I was able to be a part of the event and hope to see more chiropractors integrated in Paralympic events in the future.”

Becky Prince, executive director of USA Boccia, said Drs. Ackroyd and Stastny were a great addition to the tournament, and many athletes thanked her for making them available. “USA Boccia is very excited about this partnership and we are looking forward to more opportunities for growth,” she said. 


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