Logan's Fall Health + Safety Updates

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Fall 2020

Latest Communication & FAQs

Updates

For recent updates and communication, visit Logan.edu/HealthUpdate.

FAQs

The current self-screening process is considered the current best practice for non-residential students. Anyone who is exposed to or demonstrates symptoms of, must self-quarantine for a time determined by our COVID-19 Response Task Force Chair, Dr. Vincent DeBono, or designee. Individuals wishing to self-quarantine for a shorter period of time, may do so with a current negative COVID-19 test.

Anyone who has voluntarily or as part of a medical screening process been tested for COVID-19 must self-quarantine until the results are available and are negative as mandated by the St. Louis County re-opening plan. As a commuter campus, and until COVID-19 tests are available in our partner laboratory with results available within a few days of the test, Logan University will not implement campus wide random testing. Random campus-wide testing is not currenting considered a common or best practice for non-residential schools such as Logan University.

The University remains committed to monitoring the spread rate on campus and in the local community to make evidence-informed decisions about the best practices for keeping our campus safe.

The current best evidence for mitigating the spread of the COVID-19 virus is to employ self-screening for signs of infection, quarantine/isolation when indicated, social distancing when possible, frequent hand washing, and, most importantly, the use of appropriate face coverings/masks. Logan has instituted these procedures for the health and safety of the campus community.

The first step is to determine your level of exposure. According to the CDC close contact is defined as:

  • You were within 6 feet of someone who has COVID-19 for a total of 15 minutes or more
  • You provided care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19
  • You had direct physical contact with the person (hugged or kissed them)
  • You shared eating or drinking utensils
  • They sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on you

If you meet the criteria for close contact with an individual who has tested positive for COVID you should not report to campus. Employees should contact their direct supervisor; students should contact Student Affairs at (636) 230-1870. Additionally, you should:

  • Stay home until 14 days after last exposure and maintain social distance (at least 6 feet) from others at all times
  • Self-monitor for symptoms
  • Check temperature twice a day
  • Watch for fever, cough, or shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19
  • Avoid contact with people at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19
  • Follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/php/public-health-recommendations.html

If the individual you have been exposed to has been tested due to exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough, loss of taste or smell), you should self-quarantine. If you met the criteria of close contact (see definition above), you should self-quarantine and remain off campus until the test results are in. Employees should contact their direct supervisor, and students should contact Student Affairs at (636) 230-1870, to inform them that you are in self-quarantine due to a possible exposure. If the individual tested positive you should adhere to the guidelines of being exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 (above).

If the individual you have been exposed to that is waiting for the result is asymptomatic, you should follow the standard campus routine of self-screening and temperature monitoring when you report to campus. Should that individual become symptomatic, you should follow the guidance in the previous paragraph.

You should consider getting tested if:

  • You have symptoms of COVID-19
  • You have had close contact with someone with confirmed COVID-19. Close contact is defined as:
    • You were within 6 feet of someone who has COVID-19 for a total of 15 minutes or more
    • You provided care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19
    • You had direct physical contact with the person (hugged or kissed them)
    • You shared eating or drinking utensils
    • They sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on you
  • You have been asked or referred to get tested by your healthcare provider, local or state health department

Not everyone needs to be tested. If you do get tested, you should self-quarantine/isolate at home pending test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional.

Please note, according to current St. Louis County guidelines, individuals who have been tested for COVID-19, regardless if they are symptomatic or asymptomatic, should self-quarantine until test results have been returned.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/testing.html

You should self-quarantine/isolate at home pending test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional.

Please note, according to current St. Louis County guidelines individuals who have been tested for COVID-19, regardless is they are symptomatic or asymptomatic, should self-quarantine until test results have been returned.

If you’ve gotten tested, you should self-quarantine/isolate at home pending test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional. Please note, according to current St. Louis County guidelines, individuals who have been tested for COVID-19, regardless is they are symptomatic or asymptomatic, should self-quarantine until test results have been returned.

An individual who has tested positive for COVID-19, but is asymptomatic, should not report to campus. Employees should contact their direct supervisor; students should contact Student Affairs at (636) 230-1870, and:

  • Stay home until 14 days from date of test and maintain social distance (at least 6 feet) from others at all times
  • Self-monitor for symptoms
  • Check temperature twice a day
  • Watch for fever, cough, or shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19
  • Avoid contact with people at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19
  • Follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop

Known or presumed COVID-19-positive individuals on campus pose a risk to the entire campus

community. While the University would welcome the opportunity to follow-up on such concerns, it cannot take action unless it has specific information about the individual. All members of the campus community are expected to encourage others to follow prevailing guidelines.

If you know of someone not adhering to guidelines and, therefore, placing others in jeopardy, please report details, so the University can pursue appropriate action for the good and safety of the community. Employees should contact their direct supervisor; students should contact Student Affairs at (636) 230-1870.

Students who have tested positive for COVID-19 must report this status to Student Affairs so that an excused absence can be generated. Once we receive notice of a COVID-19-positive student we determine when the last exposure to the campus community was and what individuals may have had direct contact (within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes without a face covering). Those who may have had direct contact with a positive COVID-19 individual are contacted and self-quarantine procedures and testing recommendations are put into place.

If a student reports to a faculty member that they will be missing class due to a positive COVID-19 test, the faculty member should inquire if the student has informed Student Affairs. If they have not, the student and faculty member should contact Student Affairs at (636) 230-1870 to determine if there has been close contact with members of the campus community.

It is important to note the direct contact is defined by the CDC as being within 6 feet of an infected person for 15 minutes or longer without a face covering. Diligence and enforcement of our current face covering policies within the classroom and on-campus will mitigate the chance of direct contact exposures as defined by the CDC.